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wearing a police uniform. in other news hurricane sandy is heading towards the u.s., where it's threatening to merge with another storm early next week. sandy is now known to have killed more than 30 people as it passed through the caribbean. it caused widespread damage in the bahamas, cuba, haight tee and jamaica. sandy's trajectory shows it moving toward the eastern coast of the united states. the threat from hurricane sandy has put both u.s. presidential candidates on high alert. mitt romney's already cancelled a rally scheduled for sunday evening in virginia beach. with only 11 days until polling day, both barack obama and mitt romney have been importanting over the latest economic data. figures show the u.s. economy grew 2% in the last three months. the white house says the economy is moving in the right direction. the republicans say the figures are discouraging news. our north american editor, mark, has been with mr. romney on the campaign trail. >> if it's friday it must be iowa and ohio. for hit romney this is a relentless race from state to state, stage to stage, squ
, buying majority control of the u.s. cell company. and with nearly one-in-three americans working contract or part-time jobs. we kick off a week-long look at how a nation of freelancers is changing our labor force. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a u-turn on wall street today. stocks rose, rebounding from sell-offs last week. good news about the american consumer put investors in a buying mood. the dow jumped 95 points, the nasdaq rose 20 and the s&p 500 up 11. retail sales rose more than 1% in september, which was better than expected. it follows an even bigger gain in august and its the best back- to-back showing since 2010. erika miller has a closer look at the data and what consumers were loading up on last month. >> reporter: it seems pretty unbelievable. but a single electronic devices appears to have powered the gain in u.s. retail sales last month. if you haven't guessed it, we're talking about the iphone 5. a remarkable five million of them were sold in their first weekend alone. and that appears to have boosted electronics sales by 4.5% in september. that was the biggest incre
military hack of all time. claiming the war crimes -- ready for round the two? the u.s. presidential candidates heading to their second presidential debate and the stakes are high. welcome around the globe. the man accused of carrying out the biggest hack ever -- but today the british government ruled it will not extradite him to america. a battle waged on behalf of mr. mckinnon who's been diagnosed with as burgers a syndrome. >> he could not speak. >> her and her mother revealed how her son reacted. >> hiking and trying. it is so emotional. >> the joy and relief of a parent who has been fighting the u.s. government for one decade. >> [inaudible] >> he does not deny the u.s. charges. from 10 years ago, he carried out what one u.s. prosecutor described as the biggest military computer hack of all time. his supporters say he is a young man with a mild autism, simply looking for information on ufo's. when supporters across the political spectrum and public life. david cameron raised his case with president obama to reassess his medical condition. this is he was in serious risk of commit
spilled over into lebanon. the u.s. presidential candidates blanket their base. an actress makes a big impression on the silver screen. she takes it all in stride. >> it is great to have that attention but not too much. i don't want to get too excited. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. there are fears that the conflict in service is spilling over. an official has been killed by a huge car bomb in beirut. the leading opponent is bashar al-assad. syria's leader is being accused of being behind the bombing. >> they rushed to eastern beirut. this was as the weekend was about to begin. the bomb went off in a crowded mainly christian district of the city. local tv stations were broadcasting images of burned out cars and images of wounded people. 8 people were killed and as many as 100 were injured. the main target was a brigadier general, the chief security official in lebanon. he had recently implicated syria and its lebanese allies, hezbollah, for the killing of the prime minister. he was a fierce critic of syria. this will create shockwaves in th
grass root supporters in ohio as the u.s. presidential election campaign enters a critical week. and the miracle at medinah. europe's golfers stage one of the sport's greatest comebacks in the ryder cup. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. over the past week, peopling at the u.n. publicly weighed in the debate about what to do about the syrian conflict. today it was syria's turn to respond. president assad was unsurprisingly absent from the podium. instead, the talking was left to the country's foreign minister. walid muallem accused those spork terrorism in his country and prostriding arms to his army. he said calling president assad to step down would be serious to the affairs. he met with the secretary general to show compassion to their own people. but just how far is all the rhetoric got us? i'm joined here in the studio by steve from the u.s. institute of peace. steve, thank you very much indeed for coming in. listening to muallem's speech, what sort of insight does it give us into the way the syrian regime is thinking right now? >> well, the
people's biggest asset. only about half of u.s. households even own stocks. but what about anxiety about the presidential election and fiscal cliff? >> i think consumers really will not take notice of the political risk and political events until we are in some real critical break down stages. >> reporter: so, many consumers are feeling good heading into the holidays, even if the mood in corporate america is souring. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, the crash gold joined the sell-off today, following stocks lower, as concerns about earnings and europe, raised new questions about demand. gold fell over $20 to $17.24 an ounce, hitting a six-week low. meanwhile, european leaders wrapped up their latest summit today, the fourth this year with progress on establishing a single banking supervisor for the euro-zone. its a move that would allow the e.u.'s rescue fund to start recapitalizing ailing banks. >> susie: from wall street to >> susie: from wall street to washington: a stern warning. top banking c.e.o.'s tell lawmakers letting the fiscal cliff happen would bring quo
. story, iore on malala's spoke a brief time ago to the former u.s. ambassador to pakistan. thank you for joining us. he was saying in his report this could prove a turning point with pakistan. what do you think? >> i think there are millions of people across pakistan that certainly hope so. i was very encouraged to die. of course, it is the day of prayer for malala. the chief of the mosque in lahore calls for "and ambassador of hope." that is an enormously significant. religious scholars have issued a fatwah, determining that the attack was unislamic. these are important messages that we hope will unify pakistan and they seem to be. >> how much support do you think there is at the grass-roots level for the taliban policy of not letting girls of education? >> is basically a conservative society. you would find most people are conservative about girls' education. they supported for the first -- for the first few years. they do support -- is long does it support girls' education. -- islam does support girls' education. the fact that malala is one of them, it has personalized the issue.
on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy their broadband networking equipment from z.t.e. and huawei. >> our advice to the private sector is this: your obligation is to consider larger data protection and national security implications of your business decisions and we would not advise doing business with these two companies. >> reporter: washington has become increasingly alarmed by cyber-security threats believed to have been launched from china. cyber theft of
and general jim jones. >> i quite agree that my judgment is that much of the world wants u.s. leadership, they don't feel comfortable without it, but they no longer react to any dictatorial or any due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role america should play in the world. we should be playing the stabilizing role. we should be organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the onl
. the u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to spending by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries, tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset management joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by consumers, the federal government and the housing sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy in the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post g
they going to start moving in the right direction. >> and you were telling me that as far as u.s. investors are concerned, that there has been a decoupling of what is going on between the u.s. and europe. especially as we see that spain is probably going to get money it needs and its ratings are stabilized by moodies recently it so tell us eye little bit more that there is decoupling going on. >> sure. and i think from the market's perspective we are starting to see a decoupling. the basic they are lee is there were two big issues in europe. there was a fiscal crisis and a european banking crisis. i think the market is starting to realize that the fiscal cries his take a long time to get resolved. yet the banking crisis to a certain extent has been contained by the ecb stepping in to become the lender of last resort. so for that reason, we are looking at the markets here in the u.s. starting to focus more on fundamentals here in the united states, so much in every headline coming out of europe. >> should we be more concerned about what is going on in china, especially with the news that cam
through those trillions of dollars spent by the u.s. government each year. >> reporter: what you might not know about the federal deficit. a guided tour in and around washington, d.c. with the "wall street journal's" david wesson. >> woodruff: we have another in our series of topics not being talked about in the campaign. tonight's missing issue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can
agents arrived in benghazi to investigate the assault on the u.s. embassy last month in which four americans were killed. it comes at the same time state department e-mails were being revealed showing a request for the u.s. security team in benghazi, which was denied. >> according to these e-mails, they wanted to keep hold of a plane, which they had in libya. they said that it was important for security support for them. it was denied by the state department, and today, the state department said the reason it was denied was because these plans are only in use in countries where there is no commercial airline available. it was based in iraq and taken to libya, and as soon as commercial lenders came to libya, it was taken out. it probably would not have made a difference to what happened at the embassy, but it does raise questions about the procedures that were in place to help people escape any sort of situation of danger that they were put in. it is important to note that his plane was chartered from tripoli to benghazi to rescue those who were alive and take up the bodies as well.
on the government response, i spoke a short time ago to the u.s. congressman who represents atlantic city. i asked him what he needs the most. >> we need to get set up because of the devastation that it has caused so many people and this loss, as your reporter described. parts of north jersey, this is the lowest 1/3 of the state. there are parts of north jersey that have lots of structural damage. this has come into homes and businesses that will just be devastating. if you could imagine attempting to clean up without power, how much more difficult that is. getting power restored is of a primary concern, especially along the coast. >> i know it has only been a couple of days, but do you have any sense of how long this will take? the president has said that they will be with the residents of new jersey for however long it will take. >> it will be quite a while. i had an aerial tour with the coast guard this morning and we stressed from the delaware bay which is essentially the delaware bridge. those are rather small communities. they were totally devastated. houses that were crushed like matchbooks
before we go into the fiscal cliff debate in the u.s. so the fed will be very concerned about that. and they are going to put out a very tough stress test on the banks. we'll see what happens but i think we'll probably-- could be yet again a little bit disappointed from what we hope for in terms of dividends and share repurchase out of the big banks. >> we have to leave it there. any disclosures on the stocks that you talked about? >> no, thanks. >> have a great weekend, fred canon of kbw. >> i'm diane eastabrook in chicago. still ahead, is the housing market ready to rally? i'll tell you what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major averages were all off more than
heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing today in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to l
. until there is greater clarity on the election, the fiscal cliff and the u.s. economy, market pros predict stocks prices will remain relatively stuck. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, tonight's word on the street: regional banks, a look at why the housing comeback can't save the regional bank stocks. it's make or break tonight, for the presidential candidates. polls show president obama and governor mitt romney are neck- and-neck. tonight they have their third and final debate in boca raton, and tom is there. tom. florida is the big fridz for the campaign. it has the most number of electoral vote its at stake, in the fall election. it's also a state that has felt the full force of the great recession. the housing market in some areas in florida has shown signs of life but remains well bloat boon years. the job market in the sunshine state has seen slow recovery. >> the lunch crowd start to its file in to vinnie's all day calf nie boca raton around 11:30. despite it's name vinnys is owned by a guy named jay dietz. he bought the restaurant from vinny more tha
demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commercial building and construction side, there's still very little signs of life there. >> susie: you know wha, are your calculus telling you? we hear how businesses are weighed down by uncertainty. are they puting in more orders with you, or less? >> well, it's slowing down a little bit on some segments and other segments are strong. i believe if you look at it on a regional basis. the euro sown, as we've seen yesterday from projections. it's obviously in a difficult spot and continues to slow down. i just spent a week in china two weeks ago and had a lot of meetings with customers and as well as high government officials, and i could see that they're putting in a similar program which is strongly targeted on the i
. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the attacks on our embassies in so many other countries lie solely with those who carry them out. no one else. but it is our responsibility and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape his not to lead from behind. leaving our destiny at the mercy of events. >> woodruff: for its par, the obama campaign aired a new ad that accused romney of injecting politics into a national tragedy with his initial response to the consulate attack. >> when our u.s. diplomats were attacked in libya, the "new york times" said romney's knee-jerk response showed an extraordinary lack of presidential charac
telecom equipment makers in the world-- are a threat to u.s. security. >> ifill: we update the presidential race as both candidates compete in battleground states, and we preview the "choice 2012," airing tonight on frontline. >> woodruff: from our climate change series, hari sreenivasan reports on urban areas heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who p
been among the hardest hit workers since the great recession. the u.s. economy may be recovering, but there has not been much of a gain in construction employment. >> construction employment has been very spotty. we've seen a couple of months and then it flattens out or even drops back down. >> reporter: in the past two years, the construction industry has added 36,000 jobs. that's a fraction of the 3.9 million positions that have been created in the private sector overall. but there has been one bright spot across the nation: apartment construction. the reason has as much to do with lifestyle preference, as economics. >> there does seem to be a shift in preferences among young, potential homebuyers to live closer to the city or in the first ring of suburbs. many of them are looking to stay in apartments living rather than having a home further out where they need a car to get any where. they would have more of a mortgage they would be tied into. >> reporter: on the flip side, public spending on construction has fallen sharply. it's down 3.5% from a year ago, as state and local g
evening i'm susie gharib. u.s. stocks are trading again, after hurricane sandy forces an historic two-day shutdown. >> tom: wall street gets back to business, as damage and recovery estimates start to climb, plus, what it takes to restore power to millions in the northeast. >> susie: and with stocks open for trading, no surprise, home depot was the dow's standout. >> tom: lots ahead, that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: an historic day on here on wall street, after the storm of the century knocked down the financial district. us stock markets resumed operations today after two days in the dark, stocks were little changed: both the dow and the nasdaq fell 10 points, but the s&p 500 gained a fraction. trading here at the new york stock exchange opened without a hitch. the new york stock exchange opened right on time. and as new york's mayor bloomberg rang the opening bell this morning, traders were happy to be back to work. it looked like a normal day, with the buzz of activity, traders milling about. it was anything but normal no one knows that better than larry leibowitz, the
, bringing wind, rain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the death toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion and $20 billion, according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-related shutdown sin
in a barnburner of a race that may well decide which party controls the u.s. senate. with the stakes so high, this race is attracting big money from lots of outside groups. the incumbent fighting to hold onto his seat is democrat jon tester. and he says he's not happy about all this outside money. >> we're going to see a ton of money spent in montana. we're seeing money earlier, more of it, and with more regularity. and i think we're in the process right now of building a campaign infrastructure that's going to be very difficult to pull down as time goes on. it's getting to be big, big, big money. >> ryssdal: big money is at the heart of this story. two years ago, the supreme court changed the landscape of campaign finance with a controversial decision in a case called citizens united. it let corporations and unions spend unlimited amounts of money in campaigns. but to avoid corruption, the court said the money can't go directly to candidates. it has to go to independent outside groups. the key word here being independent. one supporter of citizens united is tester's opponent. >> see y'all l
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existing home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climate. 10 of the 12 fed districts reported economic activity in september expanded modestly since the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corrobor
increase in u.s. supplies. gasoline prices fell and now average $3.75 a gallon. prices at the pump were a hot topic in the presidential debate last night. we talk now about the outlook for energy with gareth lewis- davies commodities strategist at b.n.p. paribas. so you heard it last night, the candidates went toe to toe in the debate. governor romney accusing the president that for a doubling of gasoline prices over the last four years president obama defending himself saying it wasn't his fought that there was a recession and a recovery. so who was right here? >> well, really oil prices as a global phenomenon is dependent on what's happening with the world as a whole. so there's a limit to what one country, one government can do in terms of oil prices. what we've seen in the united states is oil production in the u.s. is increasing. but due to other factors around the world and the middle east we're still having higher prices and that's impacting the price of crude. at the moment price of gasoline is below the psychologically important $4 a gallon at the pump in the u.s.. and as such
! for the second time in three sessions, u.s. stocks suffered a sharp sell-off. prices fell as weak financial results from corporate america fed fear about the global economy. at the closing bell, the dow shed 243 points, the nasdaq lost 26.5, the s&p dropped almost 21 points, sending markets to levels not seen since early september. the heavy selling came after several household names reported weak quarterly financial reports and lowered their expectations for the rest of the year. 3-m, dupont, and xerox were among those releasing disappointing results. erika miller reports worries about revenues have cast a shadow over the profit picture. >> reporter: yes, it's earnings season. but earnings are not the most important indicator this quarter. it's revenues-- how much money a company makes before expenses. >> profits can go down, profits can go up. sales, you want to see nice steady growth. and when you are seeing big drops in revenues and revenue misses, that's definitely a red flag. >> reporter: in the latest quarter, a slew of big name firms have reported higher earnings but lower revenues,
explosion in the gulf of mexico, a layer of oil is floating in the spill area. the u.s. coast guard today said oil samples match b.p.'s macando well, and the oil giant says the sheen likely came from a bent pipe under the surface. lawmakers are calling for an inspection, but federal officials say they don't think the oil will make it to shore. two years ago, the transocean- owned and british petroleum- operated "deepwater horizon" rig exploded, killing 11 people and causing the worst offshore oil spill in u.s. history. weaker than expected demand-- that's what advanced micro devices said tonight as it cut third-quarter revenue estimates. the computer chip maker says a sluggish global economy is hurting sales across all product lines. amd now sees revenues falling 10% to around $1.3 billion. the shares ended the regular trading session up slightly at $3.20 a share. for the year, they're down 41%, and in after-hours trading tonight, they fell below $3. the a.m.d. warning comes as we see personal computer sales in a nosedive. two research firms are out with new data showing p.c. shipments in
, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: u.s. supreme court handed democrats and president obama a victory today. the court refused to block ohio voters from casting ballots on the last three days before election day. changes in state law would have stopped early voting during that period for everyone except military personnel and people living abroad. democrats argued that amounts to unequal treatment, and a lower federal court agreed. today, the supreme court refused to intervene. more than 56 million americans are going to be getting just a bit more money from social security. it's part of an annual cost-of- living adjustment. the announcement today said monthly payments will rise by 1.7%, starting in january. that works out to an average bump of roughly $21 a month, or $252 a year. the adjustment is based on the rate of inflation, which has been relatively low in 2012. regulators in europe have asked google to clarify its new privacy policy and make it easier for users to opt out. the policy allows the internet giant to combine data collected across many s
graves in advance, the victims unknown. >> the u.s. ambassador in damascus joins us. thank you. >> my pleasure. >> the last cease-fire never really existed. is there any reason to think this will be different? >> the trend in hund -- the trend in syria has been very negative. neither side believes the other will honor a cease-fire. i am pretty sure that both sides think the other will gain advantage from it. even if they agree to it from -- agree to it nominally, i have little confidence it will take hold, even four days. >> live with the syrian government agree to it? >> they might agree to it because their russian and chinese patrons have joined the un in calling for the cease- fire. they do not want to be blamed as the ones who refuse or obstructed it. and it is always possible to manufacture an incident. and there is a splinter-like group that has already said it is a filthy idea and they will not go along with it. >> what could it look like politically in syria? >> you have to be willing to sit down with your enemies. of the opposition has ruled out sitting down with assad and th
. >> maybe we will find out more in net foreign policy debate. the about this campaign, u.s. policies towards china has been a point against -- between the candidates. congressional committees called for to chinese telecommunications companies to be banned from the american market. they pose a security threats because they cannot be trusted to be free of chinese state interest. the companies denied the charges. >> congressional officials have been investigating the two huge chinese telecommunications companies for a year. now the house intelligence committee has alleged that they may be spying and not to be trusted. >> they see to expand in the united states, but as a result of our investigation, we did not have the competence these two companies can be trusted with infrastructure of such critical importance. >> the committee sounded convince the chinese state uses as cannot on the grand scale against america. >> we started looking at the new threats that has been prolific in the last few years from the chinese government when it comes to cyber as spinoffs, human as panache -- cyber and spino
. the injured several officers. not one of them later died. the u.s. ambassador to japan promised to cooperate fully in a probe into a launch of u.s. servicemen, detained on tuesday. tensions are high between the u.s. military and the locals campaigning for american bases to be removed from the island. lance armstrong was once regarded as a miracle man. not only did he win a record- breaking seven titles, he overcame cancer. the week after damning allegations were published against them, he was stripped of his car sponsorship deal with nike. he has announced that he is stepping down as chairman of his cancer charity. >> accused of being edgy, a starstruck career in danger of disintegrating. the scandal engulfing the champion gets bigger. his long-standing sponsored doesn't want to be associated with lance armstrong anymore. more than 1000 pages by the u.s. anti-doping agency, too strong to be ignored. despite constant in the aisles of wrongdoing. the announcement was made within minutes of another stunning revelation. he stepped down as chairman of the cancer charity he founded. live strong ha
be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us stipulate, as the lawyers say, that last year was a blockbuster. >> absolutely. brown: new this term has some potential itself as well, right? affirmative action. >> yes, it does, jeff. it would be a different kind of blockbuster term. last term was really a lot about the structure of government under the constitution. did congress exceed its law-making powers under the constitution when it enacted the health care law? what role do state governments have in enforcing immigration laws? this term a lot of the questions either on the docket or pending, whether the court will take them, really involve equality issues. issues arising under the equal protection act. >> brown: affirmative action is on the docket. >> it is. it's going to be argued next week. it involves the university of texas and whether it can use race as a factor in its admissions po
minority, about 9% of the u.s. electorate, in a tight election, these voters could end up providing the winner with the margin of victory. >> brown: judy woodruff gets an inside view of the financial crisis and the government bailout from former fdic head sheila bair. >> warner: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshou >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: lebanon found itself reliving a nightmarish past today after the worst bombing in four years. at least eight people were killed and nearly 80 wounded in a car-bomb attack. the explosion rocked central beirut as afternoon rush hour was getting underway, tearing t
brown examines the reality and the rhetoric over u.s.-china policy and trade. >> woodruff: from our brand-new series, "agents for change," fred de sam lazaro profiles a group that offers refuge for victims of modern-day slavery in the philippines. >> 15% of the gross domestics products comes from money sent home by overseas filipinos, but there is a dark downside that makes these vulnerable. >> and spencer michael has the story of >> ifill: and spencer michels has the story of high tech sailboats gearing up for the america's cup in san francisco next year. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> when i was in an accident, i was worried, the health system spoke a language all its own, with united health care, i got health care for my life, information on my phone, and connection to doctors who get where i'm friiÍo, and tools to estimate what are my costs, so i might never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >
, he says -- you know, he blames obama for whatever tension there is in the u.s./israel relationship today and i would argue there's very little tension in the state-to-state relationship but a lot of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to believe on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state and a two-state solution, something on other occasions he's been less than supportive of. so it's kind
debates. i personally admire their work. the u.s. is much more diverse than that. >> were you angry? were you hurt? >> we don't want to be invisible. we are not invisible. we are making sure that even with an accent that people hear what we're saying. yes, of course. >> we are mainstreaming. you try to separate us from ethnic media and mainstream media. we are mainstream media. we compete directly with abc, nbc and cbs. in many states we have higher ratings. the difference between us and them, it's under the same category, is the language. we transmit in a different language, however, now we're changing that. >> what do you mean? >> we're changing that now because now we have the joint venture with abc and we are going to be doing the same thing that we're doing but do it in english so we can make sure we have all the market. the special thing about that is it's not only for that sector of latinos who is more english dominant and prefers to speak english, but i think it actually contributes to the society and to democracy in this country so that everyone who speaks english in this country
into security failures at the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we head to colorado, where the presidential candidates are targeting suburban voters. >> some of the things romney supports, i don't think are conducive to women's issues and as a business owner, i don't think obama is a good choice. >> ifill: outrage in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action
said they hope the agreement will isolate the extremists. the u.s. food and drug administration has widened a warning about medicines made by a specialty pharmacy near boston. the new england compounding center sold tainted steroids linked to an outbreak of fungal meningitis. as of today, there were 212 cases nationwide, and at least 15 deaths. now the f.d.a. says it's investigating other illnesses that may be tied to the company's products. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: and we return to politics. the battle lines are drawn in this year's massachusetts senate race, where a republican incumbent is looking to survive in a blue state. gwen ifill has our report. >> yeah, yeah, ifill: for nine years ray flynn a staunch life-long democrat was the mayor of boston. this year he's working to re-elect a republican, scott brown. >> i see him with the veterans. he sits there and has a beer with the veterans and talks over all the issues. they love him for it. >> your u.s. senator scott brown ifill: in 2010 brown won the senate seat once held by ted kenn
, we look at the stepped-up cyber attacks on u.s. banks by iranian hackers. >> warner: we have a battleground dispatch from new hampshire, where the focus is on women voters and women candidates. >> it does seem striking, having all women, potentially, be the representatives to washington, and also potentially sitting as the executive of the state. >> woodruff: on the daily download, ray suarez talks with lauren ashburn and howard kurtz about debate watchers using twitter and other social media. >> warner: and gwen ifill sits down with author ted widmer. he's been listening to once-secret tape recordings by president john f. kennedy. >> it's really a remarkable chance for the american people to hear what it is like to be president in a very visceral way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can
for the markets. here in the u.s., the dow lost almost 33, the nasdaq gained 6.5, and not much change for the s&p; it's up about a point. >> reporter: i'm darren gersh. still ahead, both mitt romney and barack obama want to put more americans back to work. but is job training the right answer? we'll take a look. >> tom: six months before the credit crunch hit full force, j.p. morgan bought failing investment bank bear stearns. that was in 2007. now, j.p. morgan faces a lawsuit, claiming it inherited massive fraud on the part of the company it purchased. the civil lawsuit alleges systemic fraud with the packaging and sale of mortgage- backed securities by bear stearns before it was taken over by j.p. morgan. the bank says it intends to fight the case. eric schneiderman is the attorney general of new york. >> eric, you represent the people of new york state. what did your citizens lose in the deals thaw are accused of being fraudulent? >> new yorkers, like people all over the united states bought shares in mortgage backed securities, pension funds invested in them. people bought homes baseed on w
as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of posi
tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic preparations. stock markets closed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lines. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet in new york harbor. battery park on the tip of manhattan is under a mandatory evacuation, as waves already have topped the sea wall. low lying areas are at substantial risk of flood waters, including the wall street area, especially if the worst of the surge hits during high tide tonight, at 9pm eastern time. that threat of flooding was one reason u.s. stock markets were closed today, the first un- schedule
against president obama for blocking its purchase of wind farms here in the u.s.. the president said there was security concerns. they are close to a naval facility, and an area of restricted airspace. it is rare for foreign investment to be blocked in the u.s. this is the first time in 22 years. is this more about american politics than in national security policy? >> of the white house said that it took this decision because the company at the heart of the dispute could have taken actions which would have impaired u.s. national security. these when farms lie close to a military base in oregon. that is used as a training site for unmanned drones, which of course is highly secretive and sensitive equipment. the chinese company says that it will fight the decision by mr. obama to block the sale. they said that he acted unlawfully. here in china, the decision is being seen as a political one and not based on national security. the state-run news agency put out an editorial saying that this was an example of china- bashing. you might remember that mitt romney has criticized barack obama
the west of using sanctions to wage economic war against the country. u.s. officials say that this reflects the success of the economic sanctions targeted on the the nuclear program. >> a frightening crisis for the people of iran, a collapsing currency. with money losing value all the time, food prices have soared. some shops have stopped trading. many worry about jobs, savings, and why the government cannot stop it. >> the prices of food, cheese, butter, milk and even fruit have witnessed an increase of 10% in the last two weeks. people are complaining about that. they are publicly complaining about this situation and they blame the situation on a ahmadinejad. >> today, he put the blame on western sanctions. >> it is very clear, iran is being pressurized. there are sanctions from the enemy telling other nations not to buy iranian oil. this is a secret war. the enemy thinks that with these sanctions, they can defeat iran. they cannot. it is a psychological war. "you can see how much trouble the currency is in. in a week, it has lost 1/3 of their value. what is the cause? as we heard, presid
, which left the u.s. ambassador and three others dead. today, american rule makers were demanding answers about whether the levels of security were enough. testifying before a congressional committee, state department official said the correct number of agents were in place. during this election season, this issue has become controversial. our north america editor reports. in the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues -- >> the american ambassador to libya, chris stevens, and three of his colleagues died in the attack. they had repeatedly asked for tighter security. initially, the american government the attack to protest against an anti-muslim film. now they say it was a terrorist attack. >> the committee will come to order. >> republicans are outraged at the change. >> in fact, it was 9/11, the 11th anniversary of the greatest terrorist attack in u.s. history, in new york, pennsylvania, and at the pentagon. it was that the anniversary which caused an organization allied with al qaeda to attack and kill our personnel. >> this is not just about why the at
. in the caribbean, the u.s. was trying to bring out soviet submarines. what they did not know was the submarines were armed with nuclear weapons. on cuba itself, the soviets were moving warheads to the missile site and targeting the u.s. naval base on guantanamo bay. >> under the agreement of october 28, the soviets agreed to remove their medium and intermediate-range missiles from the base in cuba. americans insisted on strict monitoring verification from the air to ensure they kept on schedule. in a total failure of intelligence, u.s. commanders were blind to the existence of over 100 soviet technical weapons. meanwhile on the ground in cuba, fidel castro began to see some cooperation with moscow. >> castro is very angry at the soviet patrol. cubans feel betrayed. for them, it was like the soviet government made one concession after another to the americans and never consulted their own cuban allies. >> -christoph -- nikita khrushchev immediately dispatched his most trusted, the deputy premier, to havana. >> he was sent to to vote with the goal of healing the wounds and to influence castro. ca
. with just two weeks to go until election day, both u.s. presidential candidates are canvassing the country's swing states, hoping to seal the deal. after monday's 90-minute debate on foreign policy, now it is the final stretch. from florida, the bbc's north america editors starts our coverage. >> behind the smiles and tears is a new nervousness -- behind the smiles and cheers. make no mistake, this is a president under pressure. about time, some might say. derided for having no vision of the future, he suddenly produced a color brochure pact with old ideas. he mocked mitt romney for a new found moderation. he has coined a new word for anything about awkwardly conservative plans. >> if you say that you love american cars during a debate, but you wrote an article titled "let detroit go bankrupt," you might have romneysia. >> mitt romney did seem to forget his foreign policy, clinging close to the president's positions, stressing piece was his priority even when talking about one of president obama's greatest achievements. >> i congratulate him on taking out osama bin laden and going after th
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